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No, you do not have to wait a specific amount of time to get a booster shot after you recover from COVID-19

Some are wondering if they recently had COVID-19, should they wait to get their booster shot?

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — With the uptick in COVID-19 cases all across the country, many are now trying to get their booster shots.

Some are wondering if they recently had COVID-19, should they wait to get their booster shot?

THE QUESTION:

Is there a specific amount of time you should wait to get your booster shot if you just recovered from COVID-19?

OUR SOURCES:

THE ANSWER:

This is false.

No, you do not have to wait a specific amount of time to get a booster shot after you recover from COVID-19 unless you got an antibody treatment. Then you need to wait 90 days.

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WHAT WE FOUND:

Just a few months ago, doctors and the CDC suggested people wait 90 days to get their vaccines or booster shots after recovering from COVID-19, but does this recommendation still stand?

"That recommendation has changed now, that vaccines are plentiful," Dr. Mohammed Reza said.

RELATED: What to know about FDA approval of COVID-19 boosters for children 12 and older

"Right now the guidelines are if you recovered and are no longer symptomatic," Dr. Karla Robinson said.

Houston Methodist, which is comprised of an academic medical center and six community hospitals agrees, stating vaccine-induced immunity will offer effective protection. Doctors there suggest waiting until people have recovered from COVID-19 and are out of their isolation period, which, according to the CDC is now five days.

RELATED: CDC signs off on Pfizer booster shots at 5 months, instead of 6

However, there is one caveat.

One caveat to that is if you received monoclonal antibody treatment, something such as Regeneron, you still want to wait that 90 days," Dr. Reza said.

"If you did receive antibody treatment the recommendation is the same, you have a 90-day waiting period before having a vaccination at that point," Dr. Robinson said.

According to Houston Methodist doctors, the reason for that is the antibodies in the treatment might hinder people from developing a complete immune response to the vaccine.

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