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Fighting the flu: Electrostatic technology helps destroy germs

The electrostatic flu vaporizer is said to kill close to 100 percent of flu-related germs

SAN ANTONIO — This year's flu is hitting early and hitting hard. The flu season is expected to be worse than last year and run much longer. But one innovative device using new technology is helping hospitals, businesses and schools kill close to 100 percent of the flu virus on contact. 

Seldon Hurley, the owner of Enviro-Master San Antonio told us, "The technology is specialized, in that it puts a positive charge on, in our case, a hospital-grade germicide." Hurley said it is that positive charge that is the key. "Everything on the earth has a negative charge, so it clings wraps around and gets into all the nooks and crannies to seek out and destroy all sorts of viruses and germs."

When someone sneezes and they have the flu, the virus can spread as far as six feet away. That's why it's so important to keep all surfaces including you as disinfected as possible. Hurley added, "My daughters got sick not too long ago with the flu, and I actually sprayed my whole house and my dog ran by, and I sprayed my dog."

He sprayed his dog? With germicide? Is that safe? Hurley says yes! Hurley told us, "It's EPA registered and nontoxic, safe for the environment, and extremely effective against pathogens. You can even spray it on your hand."

Other common steps to prevent the flu include things you've heard before: avoid large crowds, wash your hands regularly, get your flu vaccine, strengthen your immune system and clean and disinfect surfaces. 

That's to protect against any illness. Hurley said the electrostatic sprayer gets more than the flu, too. "Norovirus, MRSA, all the common influenza strains and the common cold," he said.

To contact Enviro-Master San Antonio just go to www.enviro-master.com.

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