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What families should do if kids are not vaccinated

Here are the risks for different activities for children and adults, as most vaccines are not yet approved for kids.

SAN ANTONIO — Close to three million vaccines are administered every day in the U.S. and nearly all are going to adults. So what should families do if their kids aren't vaccinated yet but the parents are? 

In a nutshell there's no fine line about what families should do or who they should associate with if the kids aren't vaccinated. You have to base it on your comfort level, the activity your family may be doing, and who else and the number of people that they'll be around. 

Take dining out as an example.

"Indoor dining is is more risky than outdoor dining, but if you're eating with people when you go out to eat, it's hard to know the vaccination status of the other people, if we are talking about a restaurant," said Dr. Junda Woo, the Medical Director of the City of San Antonio Metropolitan Health District .

The guiding principle, if you're around other adults who are vaccinated, the kids have less of risk to get the virus. 

"Your children still have that risk. But we also know that children are a lot less likely to actually end up sick or in the hospital from acquiring COVID," Dr. Woo added.  

What about when it comes to traveling? That's a no because of the variants.

"By traveling we're making it easier to get variants to bring them from other places here to San Antonio or take what we have in San Antonio to other places," Dr. Woo said.  

The Pfizer vaccine is authorized for people 16 and older. The Johnson & Johnson and Moderna shots are authorized for 18 and older. Dr. Anthony Fauci says by late summer vaccines in the U.S. could be available for kids 12 and up, but for those younger, they may have to wait until next year. 

"Two households, for example, your household and someone else's, if adults are all vaccinated you could meet," Dr. Woo said.

Dr. Woo also says in school kids are okay to be three feet apart in the classroom with masks, but anywhere else inside the school or out in public, stick to the six-foot rule.