SAN ANTONIO — Some San Antonio businesses are breaking the rules and not following the 'Stay Home, Work Safe' orders, which are in effect right now.

Leaders say those who disobey should pay. District Eight City Councilman Manny Pelaez said he is receiving several complaints from employees calling out their own workplaces. 

"There is a word that perfectly describes people who are flouting this order," he said.  "It is unethical. It is obscenely unethical to be putting your neighbors and your employees at risk.

"We are hearing quite a bit from employees of call centers," he said. However, Pelaez admits it is other businesses as well.

District Two City Councilwoman Jada Andrews-Sullivan said call centers have been a problem for weeks. Her own daughter works at one.

"Mom there is no hand santizer there are no hand wipes," she said. "We are sitting right next to each other, cubicle style. There is no six-foot distance at all."

The 'Stay Home, Work Safe' order requires social distancing at work places who are still allowed to operate. These council members say enough is enough.

"The first time you educate," she said. "The second time you give a warning. The third time we might need to take a different extreme to help you understand what this means."

Councilman Pelaez said these businesses are not going to get away with breaking the rules. 

"Do I believe that we should start enforcing this and penalizing people who are, especially larger employers who are breaking the rules?" he asked. "Absolutely, and they should start expecting it."

The city manager said they will issue citations with fines. But, again first they want to educate. As of Wednesday, the city had looked at 160 violations, but issued zero citations.

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