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'First responders are janitors' | How the country's other frontline workers are taking on coronavirus

One local commercial cleaning company says they have seen a 2000% increase in calls since the start of the pandemic.

SAN ANTONIO — It can be really hard to see the sunshine through all of this, but even through these tough times for thousands, the work must go on.

"It's been bittersweet,"  Brushaud Callis said as he thought of his employees, the unspoken frontline workers.

"Literally first responders are janitors," Callis, the owner of Jan Pro Commerical Cleaning, said. "When somebody gets an active case, first person they're calling is the commercial cleaning business."

Callis owns a commercial cleaning company on the city's north side. What was once a business that maintained the day-to-day upkeep for thousands of businesses, now provides critical cleaning for essential businesses.

"We actually created what we call our COVID response team," Callis said. "So we have the electrostatic spraying machine that we actually use here that sprays a chemical that disinfects an entire facility."

Deep cleans are in high demand.

"Our phone's been ringing like crazy," he said. Jan Pro officials say they have seen a 2000% increase in calls since the start of the pandemic. Which is why Callis has decided to expand.

The commercial business will now take services for personal homes where a resident has tested positive for coronavirus, to help stop the spread.

"That is our main focus," Callis stressed.

That's a priority they'll stay fixed on as they continue to take on the darkest days with a little light.

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