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COVID-19 Vaccine Tracker: Fast facts and how to participate in Phase 1B distribution in San Antonio

As the coronavirus vaccine rolls out to the public, here's some of the key information you'll need to protect your health.

SAN ANTONIO — The FDA's approval of Pfizer's coronavirus vaccine on December 11, 2020, kicked off a new phase in the local response to the COVID-19 pandemic. For the first time, there would be a way for people to protect themselves from coronavirus transmission.

Since that time, the FDA also has approved the Moderna vaccine and is continuing to evaluate other vaccine products for use with the general public.

Under Texas state health guidelines, COVID-19 vaccine distribution is being offered in phases based on relative health risk levels. This has prompted many questions about the vaccine's distribution, accessibility, effectiveness and more.

Who can get the COVID-19 vaccine right now?

Only people who are in Tier 1A and 1B of the Texas Department of State Health Services guidelines can receive a COVID-19 vaccination at this time.

  • Phase 1A of vaccine allocation prioritizes frontline health care workers and residents of long-term care facilities.
  • Phase 1B prioritizes people over the age of 65, and people with medical conditions that put them at a greater risk of severe disease or death from COVID-19.

Scroll down for more details about the phases and whether you qualify.

Where can I get the COVID-19 vaccine?

If you qualify under Phase 1A or 1B or the state guidelines, you can seek to receive a COVID-19 vaccination. The availability of the vaccine is growing but remains extremely limited.

Most vaccinations will be done by appointment by various providers around San Antonio and statewide. KENS 5 will update this tracker with information about providers who have announced that they have appointments available:

PROVIDERS

  • Alamodome: Starting Monday, January 8, 2021, the Alamodome will serve as a no-cost mass COVID-19 vaccine site. The site will require registration and will be able to vaccinate approximately 1,500 persons per day.
  • Alicia Trevino Lopez Senior One-Stop Center:  Alicia Trevino Lopez Senior One-Stop Center will serve as a no-cost COVID-19 vaccine site. You must call to make an appointment. You can not register online. The phone number is 833-968-1745 Due to the high call volume, callers who cannot get through to a customer service representative are encouraged to keep calling back. 
  • Christus Santa Rosa: Hundreds of people joined a line outside the hospital on January 2 intended for Phase 1A. The hospital ultimately did provide some Phase 1B vaccinations that day, but they are encouraging people not to line up outside in the future. They said they plan to have a scheduling tool sometime in the future.
  • H-E-B: The grocery/pharmacy chain expects to open up online scheduling sometime in January. That announcement is likely to come first on their Newsroom page.
  • University Health: The hospital opened for Phase 1B on December 31 and filled 17,280 appointment slots in about four hours. On January 5, the hospital posted that they would open up additional appointment slots, saying: "As people do not show up or cancel, our team is reopening slots so no vaccine goes to waste." Watch for those slots here.
  • WellMed Elvira Cisneros Senior Community Center and WellMed Alicia Trevino Lopez Senior One-Stop Center: The WellMed Elvira Senior Community Center and the WellMed Alicia Trevino Senior One-Stop Center will serve as no-cost COVID-19 vaccine sites. Appointments must be made by phone. The phone number is 833-968-1745 Due to the high call volume, callers who cannot get through to a customer service representative are encouraged to keep calling back. 

In addition, the following area providers are listed as having received vaccine shipments from the state. Contact directly for potential distribution information: 

  • Bandera Family Health 
  • Caritas Family Medicine PA
  • Christus Promptu Urgent Care
  • Christus Santa Rosa Family Health Center 
  • Christus Santa Rosa Hospital Alamo Heights 
  • Davila Pharmacy 
  • Endeavor Clinical Trials 
  • Foundation Surgical Hospital Of San Antonio
  • Gruesbeck Medical Clinic
  • HEB Pharmacy (10, 106, 108, 164, 178, 189, 191, 195, 205, 211, 224, 230, 235, 26, 262, 294, 372, 384, 385, 389, 395, 397, 398, 427, 444, 463, 466, 480, 494, 555 556, 566, 567, 568, 585, 618, 623, 647, 658, 678, 699, 732, 733, 771, 84, 85)
  • Hormazd Sanjana MD 
  • Methodist Specialty And Transplant Hospital 
  • Methodist Stone Oak Hospital 
  • Northeast Methodist Hospital 
  • Quality Urgent Care 
  • Quality Urgent Care Of America
  • SAFD Office of Medical Director
  • SAMHD Main Immunizations Clinic
  • San Antonio Arthritis Care Centers
  • South Texas Allergy and Asthma Medical Profession
  • Southwest General Hospital
  • START Center For Cancer Care 
  • Steven A Davis MD
  • Stone Oak Family Doctors
  • UHS Family Health Clinic 
  • UHS Naco Perrin Clinic 402
  • UHS North 
  • UHS Southwest
  • University Health System 
  • University Of Texas Medicine 8
  • University Of Texas Medicine Hill Country
  • UT Health San Antonio Verde Hills 
  • UT Health Shavano Park PCC
  • UT Health Westover Hills Clinic 
  • UT Medicine 
  • Westover Hills Family Health

AROUND THE AREA: 

On Monday, January 4 nearly 400 residents who qualified under Phase 1B in Boerne and Kendall County got their first dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine. Kendall County anticipates receiving an additional 400 doses in the coming days, and once word is received of that delivery, additional information will be posted.

Which vaccines have been approved for use?

Pfizer-BioNTech Vaccine

The vaccine by Pfizer and German partner BioNTech is the first of two vaccines that have been approved to fight the coronavirus, which has already claimed more than 300,000 lives in the U.S. and 1.5 million lives globally, per Johns Hopkins University.

According to the U.S. Food & Drug Administration, the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine was issued an emergency use authorization (EUA) on December 11. 

On December 12, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) met to go over the FDA's recommendation that the agency issued a EUA for the vaccine. 

The CDC advisory committee ultimately voted and approved the recommendation to distribute the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine. 

The Pfizer vaccine has been approved for adults and teenagers 16 years of age and older and began distribution in the United States on December 14.

READ MORE:

Moderna Vaccine

On December 18, the U.S. added the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine to its arsenal

Moderna was the second company to apply with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for an emergency use authorization for its vaccine.

During the week of December 18, Moderna announced it was prepared to ship 6 million doses of the vaccine. More than 600,000 doses initially were sent to Texas, according to health officials.

READ MORE: FDA gives green light to Moderna COVID-19 vaccine

On December 23, 500 doses of Moderna's vaccine arrived in San Antonio. They were allotted for health care professionals.

RELATED: Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine now in San Antonio

The initial shipments of Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine were more than double the 2.9 million doses the U.S. prepared to initially ship for Pfizer’s vaccine.

Moderna expects to have between 100 million and 125 million doses available globally in the first three months of 2021, with 85 million to 100 million of those available in the United States.

AstraZeneca Vaccine

The third company to put a vaccine through trial phases is AstraZeneca in partnership with Oxford University. It is unclear when the company plans to apply for emergency use with the FDA.

Novavax Vaccine

500 San Antonians are needed for the latest COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial by Novavax. It begins this month (January) and is being conducted by UT Health San Antonio and its clinical partner, University Health.

FUJIFILM Diosynth Biotechnologies Texas has an expanded facility in College Station for large scale production of Novavax’ vaccine candidate. Click here to read more about the College Station facility.

What's the difference between the available vaccines?

The two vaccines (Pfizer and Moderna) are largely similar: 

  • Data shows both are between 94 to 95% effective.
  • Both require two doses.
  • Neither is a live virus vaccine.
  • Neither impacts your body's DNA.
  • Reported side effects for both are nearly identical: mild fever, headache, fatigue, pain at the injection site.
  • Both use new vaccine technology called mRNA. 

However, there are some differences to note between the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines: 

  • Dose timeline: Pfizer's vaccine requires your booster shot three weeks (21 days) after the first. Moderna's booster comes four weeks (28 days) later. 
  • Age limitation: Pfizer's vaccine was granted emergency use for people ages 16 and older. Moderna's, if approved, will be available for people ages 18 and up. 
  • Storage: Pfizer's vaccine has to be stored in super cold temperatures (-112 to -76 degrees Fahrenheit). Moderna's parameters are different (-13 to -5 degrees Fahrenheit). 

READ MORE: What are the differences between the Pfizer and Moderna coronavirus vaccines?

It is important to note that some coronavirus vaccines will need a second dose from the same manufacturer, so people will get a reminder card to keep track of the information.

READ MORE: Getting the COVID-19 vaccine? You'll get a vaccination card, too

Credit: Defense.gov
A Department of Health and Human Services employee holds a COVID-19 vaccine record card Nov. 13, 2020, in Washington D.C. (DoD photo by EJ Hersom)

RELATED: Why you need two doses of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines | KENS 5 Vaccine Team

Experts say the need for two doses of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines is to help the body build up a defense against the virus. 

Dr. Amesh Adalja, an infectious disease specialist offered the following explanation, "We know that there is some immunity that people will get after a single dose, but it may not be as durable, it might not last as long, and it may not be as strong as when you get two doses." 

For people who get a Pfizer vaccine, the second dose will come three weeks after the first shot. 

Moderna's booster comes four weeks later. 

When you get the first dose of either vaccine, you'll be given a vaccine card reminding you to get the second dose, which must be the same vaccine as the first dose. 

It is important not to mix doses from different makers. It's also important to note that not getting the second dose could limit the effectiveness of the vaccine.

Distribution in Texas

COVID-19 vaccine information from the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS).

Phase 1A

COVID-19 vaccinations began with Phase 1A on December 14. 

Phase 1A of vaccine allocation prioritizes frontline health care workers and residents of long-term care facilities.

As of December 25, 126,411 Texans have been vaccinated for COVID-19, with just under half a million doses distributed across the state.

READ MORE: 'No vaccine should be kept in reserve:' State officials pushing for quicker shot administration to healthcare workers, Texans over 65

During the week of December 28, first responders also began receiving their first doses of the vaccine.

On December 28, San Antonio-area resident Eugene Flores (pictured below) received his COVID-19 vaccination on his 100th birthday. 

Credit: Brookdale Senior Living

Phase 1B

On December 29, the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) announced that it would open up vaccinations to Texans in Phase 1B.

DSHS Commissioner John Hellerstedt, MD, released the following statement on vaccine administration in Texas:

“All providers that have received COVID-19 vaccine must immediately vaccinate healthcare workers, Texans over the age of 65, and people with medical conditions that put them at a greater risk of severe disease or death from COVID-19. No vaccine should be kept in reserve.”

READ MORE: When can Texans in Phase 1B get the COVID-19 vaccine?

Phase 1B includes: 

  • People 65 years old and older
  • People 16 years old and older with at least one chronic medical condition that puts them at increased risk for severe illness from the coronavirus, including but not limited to:
    • Cancer
    • Chronic kidney disease
    • COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease)
    • Heart conditions, such as heart failure, coronary artery disease, or cardiomyopathies
    • Solid-organ transplantation
    • Obesity and severe obesity (body mass index of 30 kg/m2 or higher)
    • Pregnancy
    • Sickle cell disease
    • Type 2 diabetes mellitus

READ MORE: Phase 1B: What you need to know and do before getting the COVID-19 vaccine

Timeline of vaccine distribution in San Antonio

More than 28,000 doses were expected to be available during the first week of distribution. 

December 14: UT Health San Antonio announced the arrival of 6,000 doses of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.

December 16: UT Health San Antonio front-line health care workers, including doctors, nurses, and care team members, were set to receive their first dose of the vaccine.

Credit: UT Health San Antonio

December 16: The San Antonio VA began giving the COVID-19 vaccine to staff members and residents.

December 17: The first shipment of the COVID-19 vaccine arrived at CHRISTUS Santa Rosa Hospital-Medical Center. Doses were administered to associates later that afternoon. 

December 17: A total of 11 medical facilities in Bexar County were expected to receive the vaccines during the first week:

  • San Antonio State Hospital: 975 doses
  • North Central Baptist Hospital: 975 doses
  • St. Luke's Baptist Hospital: 975 doses
  • Christus Santa Rosa Medical Center: 3,900 doses
  • Christus Santa Rosa Hospital - Westover Hills: 4,875 doses
  • University Health System - Inpatient: 5,850 doses
  • Methodist Hospital & Methodist Children's Hospital: 1,950 doses
  • Methodist Metropolitan Hospital:  975 doses
  • Northeast Baptist Hospital: 975 doses
  • Wellness 360 (Adult): 5,850 doses
  • Baptist Medical Center: 975 doses

December 18: During a press conference at the UPS Distribution Center in Austin, Governor Abbott provided an update on the statewide COVID-19 vaccine distribution. The governor shared that during the first week of distribution, 95,000 doses of the vaccine were delivered to 23 different sites throughout the state. 

READ MORE: Governor Greg Abbott: More doses of the COVID-19 vaccine should be available next week

RELATED: 'We have to have faith': As Bexar Co. reaches 'devastating' milestone in pandemic, second vaccine provides glimmer of hope

RELATED: Comal County still awaiting first vaccine shipments as frontline health care workers in neighboring SA receive immunizations

December 21: In Bexar County, more than 35,000 vaccine doses from Moderna and Pfizer were expected to arrive ahead of Christmas. 

The following facilities will receive the shipments: 

  • Bandera Family Health 
  • Caritas Family Medicine PA
  • Christus Promptu Urgent Care
  • Christus Santa Rosa Family Health Center 
  • Christus Santa Rosa Hospital Alamo Heights 
  • Davila Pharmacy 
  • Endeavor Clinical Trials 
  • Foundation Surgical Hospital Of San Antonio
  • Gruesbeck Medical Clinic
  • HEB Pharmacy (10, 106, 108, 164, 178, 189, 191, 195, 205, 211, 224, 230, 235, 26, 262, 294, 372, 384, 385, 389, 395, 397, 398, 427, 444, 463, 466, 480, 494, 555 556, 566, 567, 568, 585, 618, 623, 647, 658, 678, 699, 732, 733, 771, 84, 85)
  • Hormazd Sanjana MD 
  • Methodist Specialty And Transplant Hospital 
  • Methodist Stone Oak Hospital 
  • Northeast Methodist Hospital 
  • Quality Urgent Care 
  • Quality Urgent Care Of America
  • SAFD Office of Medical Director
  • SAMHD Main Immunizations Clinic
  • San Antonio Arthritis Care Centers
  • South Texas Allergy and Asthma Medical Profession
  • Southwest General Hospital
  • START Center For Cancer Care 
  • Steven A Davis MD
  • Stone Oak Family Doctors
  • UHS Family Health Clinic 
  • UHS Naco Perrin Clinic 402
  • UHS North 
  • UHS Southwest
  • University Health System 
  • University Of Texas Medicine 8
  • University Of Texas Medicine Hill Country
  • UT Health San Antonio Verde Hills 
  • UT Health Shavano Park PCC
  • UT Health Westover Hills Clinic 
  • UT Medicine 
  • Westover Hills Family Health

A list of Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine allocation in week 2 (the second week of Moderna vaccine; third week of vaccines overall) can be found here. 

RELATED: Some areas of Texas begin to vaccinate people 65 and older, people with pre-existing conditions

RELATED: H-E-B Pharmacies to vaccinate Phase 1B by appointment only

December 30: H-E-B announced that it would not be taking walk-in appointments for COVID-19 vaccinations. A spokesperson said that appointments will be scheduled with patients at their local pharmacies to ensure that "we use every dose in the vial as to not waste a single dose."

Those in Phase 1B are asked to use H-E-B's online scheduling tool as soon as it is launched, which is expected to be sometime next week.

December 30: San Antonio leaders attempted to address the confusion surrounding who is eligible for a vaccine. 

More than 31,000 people have received their first dose of the coronavirus vaccine in Bexar County as part of Tier 1A. Dr. Colleen Bridger, an assistant city manager, stressed that it is vital to immunize first-priority recipients (those who are part of Tier 1A), which is an estimated 140,000 eligible candidates. That includes frontline medical workers, such as hospital employees, EMS responders, long-term care facility employees, and residents, she said.

January 8: City of San Antonio officials announced that the Alamodome would serve as a no-cost mass COVID-19 vaccine site starting on January 11, 2020. 

READ MORE: San Antonio leaders attempt to provide clarity amid confusion about who is eligible for coronavirus vaccine

READ MORE: When can those eligible under Tier 1 B get the COVID vaccine?

January 9: Registration for appointments at the Alamodome site opened at 9 a.m. By 9:06 a.m. all 9,000 slots were filled. According to an official with CoSA's Office of Emergency Management, 11,000 people were on the site at 9 a.m. It was also announced this day, that the WellMed Elvira Cisneros Senior Community Center on the southside would operate as a similar no-cost vaccination site, however, appointments for this site would need to be made by phone. 

January 15: WellMed will re-open its COVID-19 hotline on Saturday, January 16 to schedule appointments for 9,000 more doses. Appointments for the first round that opened January 9 all filled up. 

The toll-free number to schedule that appointment is 833-968-1745. The hotline will be open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily until appointments are filled.

As a reminder, at this time, health care workers, anyone age 65 and older, and adults 18 and older with chronic health conditions are eligible to be vaccinated.

The Alamodome will also begin scheduling appointments for next week. 

The San Antonio Metro Health District received another 9,000-dose shipment of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines and will begin booking appointments today for the Alamodome next week. 

To avoid the overwhelming rush of residents seeking appointments that occurred with the first series of Alamodome appointments, the City of San Antonio will make appointments available on a rolling basis.

Appointments made today will be for approximately 2,000 slots on Monday; tomorrow, the City will make available 2,000 slots for Tuesday and so on. 

The registration system will continue to reopen as appointments become available.

Appointments for the Alamodome can be made by visiting this website.

Those without internet access may call 311 and select option 8 to book an appointment.  A busy signal indicates that all operators are taking other calls, and callers should try again.

'Phased Approach to Distribution'

Back in November, Dr. Anita Kurian, assistant director of Metro Health, said that there would be a phased approach regarding the distribution of the vaccine. 

Critical infrastructure and essential workers will be the first in line to get the injection. Frontline health care workers will be next, along with those working in public safety, education, and food and agriculture. 

Next will be people who live in group settings such as multi-generational households, prisons, state hospitals, homeless centers and colleges. People at high-risk for severe illness or COVID-19 impacts such as nursing home residents or elderly people will follow.

Finally, the vaccine will be available to people with limited access to vaccination services like those with disabilities or those without insurance.

READ MORE:

How vaccines work

The best way to combat misinformation is to understand the facts. So, here are the facts regarding vaccines: 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a vaccine stimulates your immune system to produce antibodies, exactly like it would if you were exposed to the disease. After getting vaccinated, immunity is developed to the disease. 

While vaccines contain the same germs that cause the disease, the germs have either been killed or weakened to the point that they don't make you sick. 

"These leading vaccine trials don't have the live virus in them," said Dr. Linda Nabha, an infectious diseases specialist. "So you can't, for example, get COVID from these vaccines that don't have the live virus in them."

That fact was backed up by other experts.

"You cannot get COVID from the vaccine itself because the vaccine doesn't include the full COVID virus," said Dr. David Diemert, an associate professor of medicine at the George Washington University. "So it's not possible for the vaccine to suddenly make the virus in the person's body."

Achieving herd immunity

Herd immunity is a term used to describe the point at which enough people are protected that the virus can be held in check. The percentage of the population required to develop herd immunity varies with each disease, according to the World Health Organization. Experts estimate at least 70% of the U.S. population needs to be vaccinated to achieve herd immunity.

Measles requires 95% of the population to be vaccinated, with the remaining 5% protected by those who are vaccinated and not spreading the virus.

Slaoui has estimated the country could reach herd immunity as early as May, based on the effectiveness of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines.

Schools and teachers

One of the big questions about the vaccine distribution is where teachers fall in the line.

San Antonio Mayor Ron Nirenberg and Bexar County Judge Nelson Wolff wrote a letter to Texas Gov. Greg Abbott requesting that teachers and faculty be included in the frontline tiers of priority recipients for the vaccine. 

The vaccine and the economy

As more members of the community continue to receive the vaccine, there is hope that the vaccine will help businesses get back to normal and ease the strain on the economy.

Venkatesh Shankar, PhD, a business professor at Texas A&M, says while the vaccines impact on the economy will be positive, those temporary changes we made in how we work, learn and consume could take hold long term.

Listen to the full conversation in our KENS 5 Commerce Street podcast:

How effective is the vaccine?

Pfizer has reported its vaccine to be 94.5% effective in clinical trials. Moderna has said its vaccine is 95% effective.

The vaccine from AstraZeneca and Oxford University suggest the vaccine is about 70% effective. Still, experts say the vaccine seems likely to be approved, despite some confusion in the results and lower levels of protection than what some other vaccine candidates have shown.

Side effects of the vaccine

There will be some side effects, said Dr. Matthew Woodruff, an immunologist at Emory University who studies the fundamentals of immune responses to vaccination.

He writes in The Conversation that vaccines work by training your immune system to recognize and remember a pathogen safely. Expected side effects include redness and swelling at the injection site and stiffness and soreness in the muscle.

A potent vaccine may even cause fever, he said. Pfizer said 3.8% of vaccine recipients during the drug trial felt fatigued, and 2% had a headache. Woodruff says this is normal.

"These are signs that the vaccine is doing what it was designed to do – train your immune system to respond against something it might otherwise ignore so that you’ll be protected later. It does not mean that the vaccine gave you COVID-19,” Woodruff said.

There also were some early questions from England after two people who received the vaccine suffered allergic reactions from the Pfizer vaccine. Experts say such reactions are not unexpected and they are usually rare and short-lived. 

READ MORE: US regulators post positive review of Pfizer vaccine data

After COVID-19

Dr. Fauci says it is necessary to get the vaccine because it isn’t certain how long natural immunity from the virus lasts. The CDC adds that early evidence suggests natural immunity, from those who’ve had the virus, may not last long. The agency also adds that immunity can vary from person to person.

READ MORE: VERIFY: Should you get the COVID-19 vaccine if you’ve already had the virus?

'Keep the mask'

For a couple of reasons, masks and social distancing still will be recommended for some time after people are vaccinated.

To start, the first coronavirus vaccines require two shots; Pfizer’s second dose comes three weeks after the first, and Moderna’s comes after four weeks. And the effect of vaccinations generally isn’t immediate.

People are expected to get some level of protection within a couple of weeks after the first shot. But full protection may not happen until a couple of weeks after the second shot.

READ MORE: Keep the mask: A vaccine won't end the US COVID-19 crisis right away

Coronavirus symptoms

The symptoms of coronavirus can be similar to the flu or a bad cold. Symptoms include fever or chills, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, new loss of taste or smell sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting and diarrhea, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

Most healthy people will have mild symptoms. A study of more than 72,000 patients by the Centers for Disease Control in China showed 80 percent of the cases there were mild.

But infections can cause pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome, kidney failure, and even death, according to the World Health Organization. Older people with underlying health conditions are most at risk.

But infections can cause pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome, kidney failure, and even death, according to the World Health Organization. Older people with underlying health conditions are most at risk.

Experts determined there was consistent evidence these conditions increase a person's risk, regardless of age:

  • Chronic kidney disease
  • COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease)
  • Obesity (BMI of 30 or higher)
  • Immunocompromised state (weakened immune system) from solid organ transplant
  • Serious heart conditions, such as heart failure, coronary artery disease, or cardiomyopathies
  • Sickle cell disease
  • Type 2 diabetes

The CDC believes symptoms may appear anywhere from two to 14 days after being exposed.

Human coronaviruses are usually spread... 

  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
  • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.
  • Some recent studies have suggested that COVID-19 may be spread by people who are not showing symptoms.

Help stop the spread of coronavirus

  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Eat and sleep separately from your family members
  • Use different utensils and dishes
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with your arm, not your hand.
  • If you use a tissue, throw it in the trash.

Find a Testing Location

City officials recommend getting a COVID-19 test if you experience fever or chills, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, new loss of taste or smell, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, or diarrhea.

A self-screening tool is available to see if you need a test.

San Antonio operates several no-cost testing locations, including two walk-up locations open Monday-Sunday from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m.:

Cuellar Community Center
5626 San Fernando St.
San Antonio, TX 78237

Ramirez Community Center
1011 Gillette Blvd.
San Antonio, TX 78224

Additionally, Freeman Coliseum offers drive-through no-cost testing from Monday through Sunday between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. An appointment is required and can be made either online or by calling (833) 213-0643.

Here's a Testing Sites Locator to help you find the testing location closest to you in San Antonio.