SAN ANTONIO — Staying at home has a lot of benefits but it also can come at a cost; which is why CPS energy is warning you now.

"We are encouraging our customers to be careful of how much energy they're using because, in the long run, we don't want them to have that sticker shock when the bill comes in," Seamus Nelson with CPS Energy told KENS 5 via FaceTime on Wednesday. 

With so many families working and learning from home in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, CPS Energy knows there's a lot more power on but that doesn't mean you can’t reduce your usage somewhere else, like shutting off your lights.

"For those of you that have kids at home, make them do it until they get tired of you telling them," Nelson said. "So they'll do it automatically. We might build some really good habits during this time at home." 

Using natural light is always a better alternative and of course, easing up on your air conditioning. 

"If you can bear even just a degree or two, it can make a big difference in how much energy you're using," Nelson added. 

At a time when you should be washing your hands frequently, SAWS says you shouldn't stress.

"Washing your hands for 20 seconds is not going to affect your water bill at all," Anne Hayden a spokesperson for SAWS said. 

In fact, the water company says current water usage is down but that may be because of the recent rain we've had lately. But what SAWS does want you to stop, is flushing things besides toilet paper down the toilet.

"We're having more sewer back-ups," Hayden said.

"We understand some people may not have access to toilet paper but if you're using anything other than toilet paper throw whatever it is in the trash can." 

More importantly, both companies want you to know while you're working through these tough times they'll keep everything running for you.

"We're stronger together," Hayden said. 

"We have your back. We're here for you," Nelson added.

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