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Spare Parts: Do you have arts and crafts supplies to donate?

A local non-profit organization says it will put your unwanted supplies to good use. They're also looking for donations of office supplies and "pre-loved" art.

SAN ANTONIO — Look around—you might have some supplies collecting dust that a nonprofit organization will gladly take off your hands.

Spare Parts is the name of San Antonio's only so-called "creative reuse organization."

"We advance the arts and creativity through sustainability and reuse," said Mary Cantú, the organization's founder. "Our programs, before COVID-19, reached all across San Antonio. We taught kids and adults how to make art the eco-friendly way."

Spare Parts is about to open a Center for Creative Reuse this winter that will sell what it refers to as "pre-loved" art, along with arts and crafts supplies and a plethora of other unique items they receive through donations — including office and school supplies, which they are selling at affordable prices.

For right now, the organization has its online store available for curbside and limited delivery if you spend $50 or more — and that's for customers inside Loop 1604 only.

Spare Parts founded the Mini Art Museum 2013 as part of a push to bring the fine arts museum experience to schools and the community.

The organization is now accepting items such as sewing accessories (crochet, knitting, embroidery, etc.), woodworking materials, photography-related items - even things like doll making items and scrapbooking things, too. For a complete list, visit this link.

To see what's for sale, check out the group's online store. And to keep up with their ongoing projects, take a look at the Spare Parts website.

Cantú said if anyone has questions about what to donate, to contact her via email at store@sparepartssa.org.

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