SAN ANTONIO — Federal authorities are launching an investigation into the Chick-Fil-A ban at the San Antonio International Airport, the latest development in the ongoing saga. 

The Federal Aviation Administration Office of Civil Rights announced it's looking into discrimination complaints. According to the FAA, "federal requirements prohibit airport operators from excluding persons on the basis of religious creed from participating in airport activities."

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The San Antonio City Council voted in March to keep the popular chicken sandwich chain from opening a location the airport, amending an agenda item to exclude it from a list of planned new retailers. Some council members cited the chain's record on LGBTQ issues. 

Since then, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has announced he is also investigating the council's decision. 

And, on Friday evening, the so-called "Save Chick-Fil-A" bill that would prevent governments in Texas from taking action based on grounds of religious faith passed the House. It's now on its way to the desk of Gov. Greg Abbott, who is expected to sign it.