More than $48 million.

That's how much debt was left by the short-lived Alliance of American Football league. Bankruptcy documents obtained by KENS 5 show some of those outstanding balances were left here in San Antonio.

For bankruptcy attorney Heidi McLeod, the 269 pages of debt the AAF collected is shocking. 

"Crazy," she muttered as she stared at the balances. 

Bankruptcy documents show the hundreds of businesses left with big bills never paid, including quite a few in San Antonio.

Some of those include: 

  • $200,000 in local catering
  • $52,000 to Central Catholic High School
  • $3,5000 to the Northside Education Foundation 
  • More than $2 million to a list of San Antonio hotels 

Unfortunately, according to McLeod, those businesses - as well as ticket holders - will never see a dime. 

"These unsecured creditors are just going to take it on the chin," she said. 

But others may see some money. 

In a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy, a trustee is appointed to liquidate whatever property the business has left. Many of those items are currently on San Antonio's northeast side. The AAF has used a warehouse to store some items since training camp.

Those at the warehouse today didn't speak on camera but told KENS 5 this is where all the office and football equipment from the 8 different teams will end up, so the trustee can sell it to hopefully cover taxes and maybe employee wages owed.