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What's the deal with Stonehenge II? Hill Country replica brings mystery to Texas

Texas' own version is 90% as tall and 60% as wide of the mysterious original group of stones in Wiltshire, England, which is nearly 5,000 years old.

INGRAM, Texas — The Texas Hill County is a destination all on its own. But the town of Ingram, Texas, is known for their beautiful monument, Stonehenge II.

Texas' own version is 90% as tall and 60% as wide of the mysterious original group of stones in Wiltshire, England, which is nearly 5,000 years old. It's one of the most famous landmarks in the U.K. Their purpose and origins remain a mystery, though it is believed the site was originally a burial ground from its earliest beginnings. It's an important site for astrological and religious ceremonies.

The Texas homage to the U.K. site was originally built in Hunt, Texas, just down the road from Ingram, by the late Al Shepperd and his neighbor Doug Hill. The idea was conceived in 1989 and construction began in 1990. It was moved to its current home in Ingram in 2010.

Credit: KENS

The amusing monument was even featured in an episode of the iconic Texas show, Friday Night Lights, where two characters chuckle over its resemblence to the original before sharing a romantic moment.

Bringing even more mystery to the site is one replica of the Moai heads. The stone sculptures are considered a creative and physical feat and were built on Easter Island in eastern Polynesia between the years 1250 and 1500. Like Stonehenge, many of the details of their origins remain a mystery.

Credit: KENS

As for Stonehenge II, plans for the future of the site include a dance floor, benches and sidewalks to make it even more welcoming for visitors. It is now overseen by the Hill Country Arts Foundation.

Click here to read more about the tourist attraction and how to get there.

RELATED: There's no mystery to who's behind Stonehenge 2 or the Moai! | Texas Outdoors

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