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HOUSTON Can a hormone help keep men from cheating? That s the suggestion in a new study published in the Journal of Neuroscience.

On a recent night, we stopped by the Kung Fu Saloon on Washington Avenue to ask singles about the idea. Once a couple is together, can a love drug help them stay together?

Who invented this drug? A man or woman, one patron asked.

Actually oxytocin is a natural hormone, linked to nursing and social bonding. Its levels increase during early romantic love, after sex and now may help keep men faithful.

I would not take it, 30-year-old Michael Smith-Palmer said flatly.

At the next table, 28-year-old Amber Crockett was all for it.

If that s true, give my boyfriend some of that! she exclaimed.

Meanwhile 31-year-old Adam Ruther had a requirement.

I think it s gotta to be you ve got the right woman, he said.

German researchers at the University of Bonn, tested 57 men with a nasal spray. Half got a placebo. Half got oxytocin. Then they introduced an attractive research assistant.

The guys that got the oxytocin wouldn t get quite as close to the attractive woman as the guys who got the placebo, Dr. Parviz Kavoussi, a urologist who specializes in fertility and reproductive medicine explained.

The Austin physician added, If they have a higher level of oxytocin they might have a higher level of bond commitment in their relationship.

So who s up for a shot?

Like you spray your dog for fleas? One young woman jokingly asked.

There s not a chance I would ever need a spray.

Lauren Laureto, 27, looked into our camera, pointed and said simply, Greg!

While several young men proclaimed, I do not need a drug for that.

Shane Heumann, 30, was skeptical.

I can t see that working. A hot girl is gonna be a hot girl, whether you spray something or not, but I don t have a girlfriend, he said.

That actually matters. Researchers found oxytocin had no effect on single guys.

As for the men who took the fidelity drug; how much farther away did they stay from the attractive woman? About six inches, researchers said.

For more: http://www.jneurosci.org/content/32/46/16074

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