Sutherland Springs community moving forward: 'We just keep going'

Many will be immersed in grief for a very long time after this attack, but as a crowd gathered in Floresville last night to listen to the Vice President honor those killed and wounded in Sutherland Springs, there are others moving on.Eyewitness News Repo

SUTHERLAND SPRINGS, TX - Many will be immersed in grief for a very long time after this attack, but as a crowd gathered in Floresville Wednesday night to listen to the Vice-President honor those killed and wounded in Sutherland Springs, there are others moving on.

 

Everyone who drove to the football stadium traveled down dark, wet, bleak roads, a mirror of the mood of the community.  

 

In sharp contrast, at the stadium, bathed in bright light, a flag at half-staff waved briskly, encouraging those who came together to grieve.

 

Meanwhile, outside the stadium, there were others doing what Texans do, honoring the dead by living, working and moving on.

 

Marc Pesina stood across the street, silently listening to the loudspeakers, thinking about what will come next.

 

“I just think it's important to be out here to support those who have perished.  I just want to reflect on what happened,” Pesina said.

 

The military veteran continued “For myself, personally, I think faith. Tomorrow you're still here. You're in America. You're free. You're able to voice any religious beliefs you have. To me, what's more important is getting up every day and fighting for their memories."

 

Pumping gas and preparing for a new day or hunting and gathering dinner with a friend Wilson County neighbors talked about how they stay strong.

 

Grace Alfaro stood in her front yard, holding her granddaughters tight.  Alfaro said she and her family used to attend church at First Baptist years ago.
 

Alfaro said "We just keep going. We keep going. We have to."

 

Tyler Bigler shivered under a blanket as he returned to his car.  Bigler said "We know to roll with the punches and pick up and move on.  I think it's the Texas way, honestly."

 

Wyatt Talley, who said he turned 16 on Wednesday and spent his birthday at the vigil said the power of faith keeps him going.

 

"Praying and seeing how the community and how everyone pitches in to help and it makes you feel good," Talley said.

 

His sister, 10-year-old Macie, said "I think that it is awesome that they come together and that's what makes me happy about all of it."

© 2017 KENS-TV


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