PHOTOS: Keep a San Antonio lawn alive with these drought-resistant tips

<font color = 000099><b>PHOTOS: </font></b>Keep a San Antonio lawn alive with these drought-resistant tips

Credit: Bailey McGowan / KENS 5

It's toasty and San Antonio could see Stage 3 water restrictions before the end of the summer. There are some ways people can help plan for the hottest part of the year and keep their lawn beautiful. San Antonio Water System Conservation Coordinator Mark Peterson offered these tips

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by Bailey McGowan / Kens5.com

kens5.com

Posted on July 26, 2013 at 3:31 PM

Updated Friday, Jul 26 at 5:53 PM

It's toasty and San Antonio could see Stage 3 water restrictions before the end of the summer. There are some ways people can help plan for the hottest part of the year and keep their lawn beautiful. San Antonio Water System Conservation Coordinator Mark Peterson offered these tips:

Know your level of sun

Before planting a garden, or yard for that matter, people should know how much sun their lawn is getting. A lot of direct sunlight means people should probably use a drought-level style of grass. Some grasses do best in direct sunlight, including  some versions of St. Augustine grass.

Low-turf, high beds

Grass needs more water than flower beds. This  means that if people keep a low amount of turf and a high number of beds they can keep their watering needs down. People can plant high and low-level water plants in the bed. Planting native can also help local wildlife

Perennials will last longer

Perennials in beds will last longer after they are established in absence of rain. Perennials don't need watering if it rains and they've survived in an absence of rain already. Other than that, they only need to be watered twice a month.

Compost, aerate and mow high for healthy lawns

Composting and aerating a lawn once during the spring and once during the fall will help keep a lawn healthy. In the summer, people can keep their lawn high in order to water less. This means if San Antonio does move to Stage 3 water restrictions, people will only need to water their lawn every other week to keep it alive.  Lush is not a water-conservatively supportive way to keep a lawn in the summer!

Drip or hand-watering can keep plants alive

Switching to a drip system or hand-watering can also help conserve water during the summer, or using recycled water. Peppers and eggplant are some vegetables that do well in the summer, but right now most vegetables are not flourishing.

SAWS also offers tips on what plants will survive best during the hot summer months and has two different displays at the San Antonio Botanical gardens to help.

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