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WENDY RIGBY: Visionary science pioneer's papers donated to UTSA

WENDY RIGBY: Visionary science pioneer's papers donated to UTSA

Credit: Texas Biomedical Research Institute

Kenneth P. Trevett, Texas Biomed president and CEO (left) with Texas Biomed librarian Danny Jones look over the Tom Slick papers.

by Wendy Rigby / KENS 5

kens5.com

Posted on August 11, 2011 at 3:02 PM

Updated Monday, Nov 4 at 7:49 AM

He was a man with a vision. Tom Slick had wide-ranging interests, from breeding cattle to the paranormal, from Arabian horses to scientific research. He was an heir to an oil business and so much more. 

Most San Antonians are familiar with two of his major accomplishments. Thomas Baker Slick, Jr. is the founder of Texas Biomedical Research Institute (formerly Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, otherwise known as the "place with the monkeys" on Loop 410) and Southwest Research Institute.
 
In 1962, Slick died in a plane crash at the age of 46. His legacy lives on in the many important scientific breakthroughs the brilliant minds these two San Antonio scientific institutions have made.
 
Now, his family has donated his papers to the University Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) Libraries Special Collection. Those papers will be available to scholars and researchers who want to find out about the origins of biomedical and scientific research in San Antonio. The documents also hold a lot of information about the oil and gas industry. We're told he left a vast amount of correspondence that spans from 1938 to 1962.
 
This is the first time in 40 years all of this information will be made available to the public. The collection takes up 75 boxes!
 
"We are very pleased that these papers, which are so important to the history of San Antonio, will be housed in a state-of-the-art facility where historians and others will have access to them," said Kenneth P. Trevett, Texas Biomed's president and CEO. "Tom Slick was a remarkable visionary who really thought San Antonio would become a city of science and health, which indeed it has."
 

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